News 2014


Movement in the 2013 German art auctions

Inge.jpg
Lausanne.jpg


Inge with black cap. 1930/1932             
Oil on canvas
99 x 73 cm
Privately owned

Lausanne. 1922/1923
Oil on canvas
70 x 80 cm
Privately owned

 

The 2013 art market proved successful for many of Oskar Moll's works, particularly for a woman's portrait with a surprising knockdown price. At the beginning of June, two paintings changed hands at Van Ham auctions in Cologne: a landscape with the Koenigsallee bridge (knockdown price € 19,000), a motif in Berlin-Grunewald which Oskar Moll painted several times, from various standpoints, during World War I. Then there was the Still life with NOVEM (knockdown price € 20,000), painted in Breslau in 1929, during his Cubist period. More of a stir, however, was occasioned at Van Ham on 28 November by the portrait Inge with black cap (illus.), originally kept in the Sander Gallery in Washington. The young woman absorbed in a book is Inge von Mandel, a student in Breslau, whose interesting beauty had attracted his attention. She had been a close friend of Oskar and Marg Moll since 1930, and Oskar – then professor at the Breslau Academy of Art – took the opportunity of portraying her in a variety of poses until 1932. At auction, the rediscovered painting fetched a top price for a portrait by Moll (who is regarded as more of a still-life painter) – finishing at € 53,750. Finally, on 29 November a new discovery, the post-Impressionist landscape Lausanne (illus.) came under the hammer at Grisebach Auctions in Berlin, going for € 15,000. Between 1922 and 1925, the Molls took regular trips to Levanto, travelling through Switzerland to the Italian region of Liguria. The motif in question was located above Bellerive-Plage, Lausanne, from where Oskar Moll enjoyed a panoramic view over Lake Geneva and the steep slopes of the Lavaux vineyards, and as far as the Vaud Alps. Adhesive labels on the stretcher frame show that the painting was exhibited at the end of the 1920s in the Deutsche Kunstgemeinschaft, Berlin, and in the distinguished Hamburg Galerie Commeter. After 1945, the work disappeared, and was for a long time in private ownership in Poland.